Typhoon Haiyan One Year On: Recovering Lost Livelihoods in the Philippines

November 7, 2014
Photo by Steve De Neef

Over the past year, Concern Worldwide has been working to help the poorest, most vulnerable, and hardest-to-reach communities living in along the coastlines and on small islands in the western Visayas region.

One year after Typhoon Haiyan, the strongest storm on record, devastated the Philippines, Filipinos are on the road to recovery and  rebuilding  their lives and livelihoods.

Over the past year, Concern Worldwide has been working to help the poorest, most vulnerable, and hardest-to-reach communities living in along the coastlines and on small islands in the western Visayas region.  In partnership with local and provincial governments, all our work has been implemented with the future in mind.  Our programs are built around the needs of the community as they have expressed to us, and the gains they are making will be sustained long after our work is done.

Recovery in the Philippines

Filipinos living in the municipality of Concepcion, located in the western Visayas region, talk about how their lives have changed a year after Typhoon Haiyan.

Restoring Fishermen’s livelihoods

The boats of many small-scale fishermen, among the poorest people in the rural areas of the Philippines, were either damaged or destroyed by the typhoon.  Concern’s recovery work focused on repairing and replacing boats to enable them to make a living again.

Also watch: Jonel’s story. The life of a fisherman.

Rehabilitating Mangroves and Coral Reefs

The combination of marine ecosystem destruction and illegal fishing practices has contributed to a historic decline of fish stocks in Visayan waters.  The added damage cause by Typhoon Haiyan is projected to have a long-term negative impact if nothing is done to restore habitats.  Concern is working to support the rehabilitation of damaged mangroves and coral reefs. The restoration of these ecosystems will revive marine life and support the livelihoods of coastal communities.

Rebuilding Schools in Concepcion

Over 90 percent of schools in Concepcion were completely destroyed by Typhoon Haiyan. Children also missed  three or more months of school and today most are still learning under makeshift tents and shelters. Concern is working to get children back into safe classrooms in some of the most vulnerable island communities.

Island to Island Water Piping

On the islands off the coast of Concepcion, even prior to Typhoon Haiyan, sourcing fresh water was already a serious problem for communities.  With almost all infrastructure destroyed by the typhoon, Concern built water pipelines under the sea bed to connect the islands to vital clean water sources.

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