Climate & Environment

Those who bear the least responsibility for climate change suffer its effects the most. Here’s what we’re doing about that.

We promote eco-friendly farming techniques that are tailored to local environments and designed to improve food security and nutrition, helping communities sustainably manage water and other natural resources.

The UN estimates that 70% of disasters are now climate related. By 2030, climate change could force more than 100 million people into extreme poverty. By that same year, half the world’s population is expected to live in a water-stressed area. 

Those who bear the least responsibility for climate change suffer its effects the most. These effects include food and water scarcity, lost livelihoods, lower education levels, and gender-based violence. In short, climate change perpetuates poverty.

Stand with those most affected by the climate crisis

How we do it

Climate Smart Agriculture

The majority of people Concern works with are involved in some way with farming and food production. In countries like Malawi and Afghanistan, it’s essentially everyone. Many of these communities are also on the frontlines of climate change. We work with rural communities to promote new growing techniques, source improved seeds, trial alternative crops, and implement soil protection practices.

We support communities to adopt Climate Smart Agriculture (CSA) practices in order to become more resilient to a less-predictable climate. We also work to strengthen links with the private sector to facilitate access to supplies and equipment. We are committed to rolling out CSA to 600,000 farmers as part of our strategic plan, while also supporting the African Union to roll out CSA to 6 million farmers on the continent by 2021.

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Disaster Risk Reduction

Disaster risk reduction (DRR) protects the lives and livelihoods of communities and individuals who are most vulnerable to disasters or emergencies. Whether the crisis is caused by nature or humans (or a combination of both), DRR limits its negative impact on those who stand to lose the most.

In some cases, we can reduce the size of a disaster, its strength, or even how frequently it occurs. In tandem with this, we can also make sure that those who are most exposed to these hazards are able to better anticipate, survive, and recover. DRR focuses specifically on the three key dimensions of disaster risk:

  1. Exposure to hazards
  2. Vulnerability and capacity
  3. Characteristics of each hazard

With this in mind, the goal of DRR is to prevent new risks, reduce existing risks, and increase overall resilience.

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Nature-Based Solutions

We find solutions that protect, sustainably manage, and restore natural or modified ecosystems to address societal challenges. Nature-based solutions not only help to offset the immediate land degradation caused by climate change, but also address challenges like food security, water security, public health, and social and economic development.

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Climate Smart Agriculture

The majority of people Concern works with are involved in some way with farming and food production. In countries like Malawi and Afghanistan, it’s essentially everyone. Many of these communities are also on the frontlines of climate change. We work with rural communities to promote new growing techniques, source improved seeds, trial alternative crops, and implement soil protection practices.

We support communities to adopt Climate Smart Agriculture (CSA) practices in order to become more resilient to a less-predictable climate. We also work to strengthen links with the private sector to facilitate access to supplies and equipment. We are committed to rolling out CSA to 600,000 farmers as part of our strategic plan, while also supporting the African Union to roll out CSA to 6 million farmers on the continent by 2021.

Learn More
close

Disaster Risk Reduction

Disaster risk reduction (DRR) protects the lives and livelihoods of communities and individuals who are most vulnerable to disasters or emergencies. Whether the crisis is caused by nature or humans (or a combination of both), DRR limits its negative impact on those who stand to lose the most.

In some cases, we can reduce the size of a disaster, its strength, or even how frequently it occurs. In tandem with this, we can also make sure that those who are most exposed to these hazards are able to better anticipate, survive, and recover. DRR focuses specifically on the three key dimensions of disaster risk:

  1. Exposure to hazards
  2. Vulnerability and capacity
  3. Characteristics of each hazard

With this in mind, the goal of DRR is to prevent new risks, reduce existing risks, and increase overall resilience.

Learn More
close

Nature-Based Solutions

We find solutions that protect, sustainably manage, and restore natural or modified ecosystems to address societal challenges. Nature-based solutions not only help to offset the immediate land degradation caused by climate change, but also address challenges like food security, water security, public health, and social and economic development.

Learn More

Our Impact

And that’s just in one year.

For every dollar donated to Concern, $0.93 goes directly into our life-saving programs in 23 of the world’s most vulnerable countries. Your tax-deductible gift makes you part of a vital community that enables us to reach millions of people each year with dynamic climate response. 

Our work in action

The LEAF Project

Concern’s partnership with a US food ingredients giant has been producing exciting results in East Africa.

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Paribartan

Project Paribartan is helping over 1.2 million vulnerable people in 204 communities across Bangladesh and India become more resilient and adaptable to the challenges of climate change. By working hand in hand with communities to develop alternative livelihoods, grow climate-smart crops, prepare against future disasters, and rehabilitate degraded land, we are creating sustainable solutions to poverty while impacting positively on the environment. Multifaceted in its approach, Paribartan helps people improve their lives — and their environment:

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BRCiS

Traditional aid models have, often by necessity, relied on certainty. But in emergency contexts, this doesn’t always work. As we saw with the 2010-12 famine, waiting for the full picture of need and risk to develop wasted precious lead-time. Somalis paid the ultimate price. 

Breaking with tradition, we created an approach to emergencies called Early Warning, Early Action (EWEA). This “no regrets” strategy forms the foundation of BRCiS. Instead of responding to an emergency based on certainty, we began responding (proportionately) to the probability of a disaster. In some cases, this meant that we responded early to the signs of a crisis that didn’t come to pass. But, in the long term, EWEA still saves money: An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Learn More
close

The LEAF Project

Concern’s partnership with a US food ingredients giant has been producing exciting results in East Africa.

Learn More
close

Paribartan

Project Paribartan is helping over 1.2 million vulnerable people in 204 communities across Bangladesh and India become more resilient and adaptable to the challenges of climate change. By working hand in hand with communities to develop alternative livelihoods, grow climate-smart crops, prepare against future disasters, and rehabilitate degraded land, we are creating sustainable solutions to poverty while impacting positively on the environment. Multifaceted in its approach, Paribartan helps people improve their lives — and their environment:

Learn More
close

BRCiS

Traditional aid models have, often by necessity, relied on certainty. But in emergency contexts, this doesn’t always work. As we saw with the 2010-12 famine, waiting for the full picture of need and risk to develop wasted precious lead-time. Somalis paid the ultimate price. 

Breaking with tradition, we created an approach to emergencies called Early Warning, Early Action (EWEA). This “no regrets” strategy forms the foundation of BRCiS. Instead of responding to an emergency based on certainty, we began responding (proportionately) to the probability of a disaster. In some cases, this meant that we responded early to the signs of a crisis that didn’t come to pass. But, in the long term, EWEA still saves money: An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Learn More