Education

Education is key to ending poverty. You can help us bring quality education to those who need it.

If all children in low-income countries acquired basic reading skills, an estimated 171 million people could break the generational cycle of extreme poverty. Concern’s work is grounded in the belief that all children have a right to a quality education.

We integrate our education programs into both our development and emergency work to give children living in extreme poverty more opportunities in life and supporting their overall well-being. Concern has brought quality education to villages that are off the grid, engaged local community leaders to find solutions to keep girls in school, and provided mentorship and training for teachers.

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How We Do It

Increase Access to Education

We address the unique barriers each community faces to education. This might mean helping to refurbish or retrofit schools that have been destroyed by natural disaster, or ensuring that they have safe and dignified facilities for both boys and girls—ensuring that girls who might otherwise miss school while they are on their cycle, due to a lack of facilities, don’t have to. Father’s groups in countries like Malawi help to bring down rates of early marriage, which often mean that girls leave school before they’ve graduated.

We set up smaller and informal learning environments in villages that are otherwise far from the nearest school, allowing children and their parents to develop literacy and numeracy skills closer to home. During the 2014-16 Ebola epidemic, we set up remote learning options via radio to accommodate for quarantines and lockdowns.

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Quality of Teaching and Learning

At least least 250 million school-aged children worldwide currently do not know the basics in reading and mathematics. This poor level of literacy drives school drop-out and exam failure and blocks students from progressing to secondary school. Ultimately, it puts millions of children at a cruel disadvantage for the rest of their lives.

In order to accurately assess, improve and monitor literacy levels, Concern has refined and expanded the sector-leading Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA) tool among the most vulnerable communities. Our EGRA tool – a series of short oral tests taken in the early grades of primary school – allows us to assess and then address children’s learning needs at an early age. It also allows us to identify knowledge gaps, gather robust data and monitor progress so we can accurately evaluate the success of programs over time.

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Safe Learning Environments

All children require a safe space to learn and develop. Unfortunately, both physical and psychological aggression and gender biases are prevalent in far too many schools. Concern is working to address school-related gender-based violence (SRGBV) in education programs across Liberia, Sierra Leone, Niger, Somalia, and Malawi. We aim to reduce violence and improve methods for responding to violence, as well as addressing attitudes and influences both within and outside of school, from local to national level.

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Increase Access to Education

We address the unique barriers each community faces to education. This might mean helping to refurbish or retrofit schools that have been destroyed by natural disaster, or ensuring that they have safe and dignified facilities for both boys and girls—ensuring that girls who might otherwise miss school while they are on their cycle, due to a lack of facilities, don’t have to. Father’s groups in countries like Malawi help to bring down rates of early marriage, which often mean that girls leave school before they’ve graduated.

We set up smaller and informal learning environments in villages that are otherwise far from the nearest school, allowing children and their parents to develop literacy and numeracy skills closer to home. During the 2014-16 Ebola epidemic, we set up remote learning options via radio to accommodate for quarantines and lockdowns.

Learn More
close

Quality of Teaching and Learning

At least least 250 million school-aged children worldwide currently do not know the basics in reading and mathematics. This poor level of literacy drives school drop-out and exam failure and blocks students from progressing to secondary school. Ultimately, it puts millions of children at a cruel disadvantage for the rest of their lives.

In order to accurately assess, improve and monitor literacy levels, Concern has refined and expanded the sector-leading Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA) tool among the most vulnerable communities. Our EGRA tool – a series of short oral tests taken in the early grades of primary school – allows us to assess and then address children’s learning needs at an early age. It also allows us to identify knowledge gaps, gather robust data and monitor progress so we can accurately evaluate the success of programs over time.

Learn More
close

Safe Learning Environments

All children require a safe space to learn and develop. Unfortunately, both physical and psychological aggression and gender biases are prevalent in far too many schools. Concern is working to address school-related gender-based violence (SRGBV) in education programs across Liberia, Sierra Leone, Niger, Somalia, and Malawi. We aim to reduce violence and improve methods for responding to violence, as well as addressing attitudes and influences both within and outside of school, from local to national level.

Our Impact

And that’s just in one year.

For every dollar donated to Concern, $0.93 goes directly into our life-saving programs in 23 of the world’s most vulnerable countries. Your tax-deductible gift makes you part of a vital community that enables us to reach over 1 million people each year with innovative education solutions.

Our Work In Action

Safe Learning Model

Our pioneering multi-million dollar, five-year pilot program (funded by Irish Aid), is the first ever large-scale research project to explore the link between school-related gender-based violence and literacy. The larger question it will help to answer: What are the ideal elements for a safe learning environment that allows students to thrive? 

Learn More

Home Learning Techniques

An estimated 1.75 million school aged children in Syria and over 40% of Syrian refugee children remain out-of-school1 . The government of Lebanon, host to over 1 million Syrian refugees, has made efforts to broaden Syrian refugee children’s access to the public education system. However, barriers to education remain high and include associated costs of going to school, such as learning materials, books and transport. Other issues including safety in schools, language challenges and high levels of child labour continue to keep Syrian children out of school.

Concern Lebanon has been providing children with early childhood education opportunities, language classes and homework support to increase their access to learning opportunities. In addition to this, parents realize the importance of supporting their children at home. However, many parents and caregivers do not have the confidence, skills or the know how to help them. Concern has therefore, developed the Home Learning Techniques curriculum, which builds the capacity of parents so that they can engage in activities at home that help their children in their development and academics.

Right to Learn

In 2016, the Mpata Primary School in the district of Phalombe in Southern Malawi, was experiencing drastic dropout rates among its female students. The school only had male teachers, and had been without a female teacher for over eight years. Eventually however, the local community came together to improve the educational environment in their local school.

A key challenge for the community in Phalombe was that Mpata Primary School only had male teachers. The school had been without a female teacher for over 8 years.

It’s been proven that a lack of female teachers in rural primary schools demotivates female students from attending, and remaining in school as there are no clear role models for them to look up to. Also, when girls start to experience menstruation, they can often feel embarrassed and think that they have no one to go to for guidance. More worryingly, reporting gender based violence, especially of a sexual nature is not easy for girls to do when speaking to a male teacher.

The Phalombe community made a collective decision to address the lack of gender balance and came together to create a change within their education system.

With the help from Concern, committee meetings were held to engage key policy holders at community level to successfully advocate and lobby for a female teacher at their school. This in turn strengthened the collaboration between community groups and schools in responding to sexual and reproductive health issues and school-related gender-based violence.

close

Safe Learning Model

Our pioneering multi-million dollar, five-year pilot program (funded by Irish Aid), is the first ever large-scale research project to explore the link between school-related gender-based violence and literacy. The larger question it will help to answer: What are the ideal elements for a safe learning environment that allows students to thrive? 

Learn More
close

Home Learning Techniques

An estimated 1.75 million school aged children in Syria and over 40% of Syrian refugee children remain out-of-school1 . The government of Lebanon, host to over 1 million Syrian refugees, has made efforts to broaden Syrian refugee children’s access to the public education system. However, barriers to education remain high and include associated costs of going to school, such as learning materials, books and transport. Other issues including safety in schools, language challenges and high levels of child labour continue to keep Syrian children out of school.

Concern Lebanon has been providing children with early childhood education opportunities, language classes and homework support to increase their access to learning opportunities. In addition to this, parents realize the importance of supporting their children at home. However, many parents and caregivers do not have the confidence, skills or the know how to help them. Concern has therefore, developed the Home Learning Techniques curriculum, which builds the capacity of parents so that they can engage in activities at home that help their children in their development and academics.

close

Right to Learn

In 2016, the Mpata Primary School in the district of Phalombe in Southern Malawi, was experiencing drastic dropout rates among its female students. The school only had male teachers, and had been without a female teacher for over eight years. Eventually however, the local community came together to improve the educational environment in their local school.

A key challenge for the community in Phalombe was that Mpata Primary School only had male teachers. The school had been without a female teacher for over 8 years.

It’s been proven that a lack of female teachers in rural primary schools demotivates female students from attending, and remaining in school as there are no clear role models for them to look up to. Also, when girls start to experience menstruation, they can often feel embarrassed and think that they have no one to go to for guidance. More worryingly, reporting gender based violence, especially of a sexual nature is not easy for girls to do when speaking to a male teacher.

The Phalombe community made a collective decision to address the lack of gender balance and came together to create a change within their education system.

With the help from Concern, committee meetings were held to engage key policy holders at community level to successfully advocate and lobby for a female teacher at their school. This in turn strengthened the collaboration between community groups and schools in responding to sexual and reproductive health issues and school-related gender-based violence.